Validity & Correctness Before the OS

Validity and Correctness Before the OS: the Case of LEO I and LEO II
Rabia Arif, Elisabetta Mori, Giuseppe Primiero
in
Reflections on Programming Systems. Historical and Philosophical Aspects
Edited by Liesbeth De Mol and Giuseppe Primiero
Springer, 2019

Efficient and reliable computing is based on validity and correctness. Techniques to ensure these essential features have been in place since the early days of computing. The present study focuses on the hardware testing, data validation and program correctness techniques designed and implemented for LEO I and II machines in the UK during the 1950s. Continue reading “Validity & Correctness Before the OS”

Business computing seminar in Lille

Olivetti Elea 9003. Detail. Photo: Elisabetta Mori

Pierre Mounier-Kuhn
(CNRS, Université Paris-Sorbonne & Centre Alexandre Koyré)
De la mécanographie à l’Informatique de gestion

Elisabetta Mori (Middlesex University, London)
From Academia to Business: LEO computers and Olivetti.
Two case studies in the early European Computer Industry

Histoire et Philosophie de l’informatique et du calcul
MESHS, 2 Rue des Canonniers, 59000 Lille
Info: https://calcul.hypotheses.org/435

Elisabetta Mori
From Academia to Business: LEO computers and Olivetti.
Two case studies in the early European Computer Industry

A common pattern in the growth and development of early Western European computer manufacturers is the collaboration between academia and entrepreneurship. Very often early European computer companies established a joint venture with an academic environment – a university or a research institute. Continue reading “Business computing seminar in Lille”

Coping with the “American giants”

Abstract of the paper presented at the 4th HaPoC – History and Philosophy of Computing conference in Brno, 3-7 October 2017.

Coping with the “American giants”: mergers, relationships and attempted partnerships in the European computer industry in the early Sixties

During the 1950s, a fragmented computer industry grew up in Europe. After the enthusiasm and pioneering in a brand new business like computers, at the beginning of the 1960s these companies were weakened by several issues, such as the financial crisis and the pressure of  US competitors like IBM and General Electric. The investments in R&D  were not fully refunded by the income from machines sales after several years. The growth of a computer company, in fact, was often doomed by these costs and very often also by lack of proper marketing experience in a totally brand new field. Continue reading “Coping with the “American giants””

From LEO to DeepMind @ London School of Economics

LEO-2
LEO II/1 – Peter Wood at the tabulator and Kate Keen at the control desk. Source: Leo Computers Society

On Friday October 14th, 2016, 6.30-7.30 PM the London School of Economics is hosting the event:
From LEO to DeepMind: Britain’s computing pioneers, organized by the Department of Management LSE and LEO Computers Society.
Alphabet executive chairman Eric Schmidt will discuss progress in CS education and digital skills, and the opportunities that flow from the next wave of British computing innovation in machine learning. Join Eric in conversation with Professor Chrisanthi Avgerou, Professor of Information Systems at LSE’s Department of Management and Programme Director of LSE’s MSc Management, Information Systems and Digital Innovation.

This event is free and open to all however a ticket is required: more info available on LSE website.

The Story of LEO Computers @ London Metropolitan Archives

LEO II
LEO II/2 – W.D. & H.O. Wills. Source: Leo Computers Society

On Wednesday June 22nd, 2016 2-3 PM, at the London Metropolitan Archives Neville Lyons will give a talk about LEO Computers series. LEO 1 is the very first business computer, designed and manufactured by Lyons & Co. The speaker, a relative of the company’s co-founder Joseph Lyons will depict the profiles of some key individuals involved and how some leading industrial companies and government departments seized upon the invention and purchased models of this new ‘electronic brain’. Moreover, a video will be shown featuring programmers and designers who were involved in the early days of LEO.
Tickets and info available on Eventbrite